Testing Services and Capabilities

 

 

LandTest's capabilities are best described by their equipment.

LandTest has invested considerable resources into attaining the latest state-of-the-art geotechnical testing technology. This European equipment has been meticulously selected to allow the quick and efficient recording of soil parameters and makeup through the use of the following tests:

The equipment is capable of soils investigation up to 30m in depth, and can easily be maneuvered into positions that may not have previously allowed this type of investigation to take place. Realtime information is sent directly from the testing location via the on board computer software and corresponding hardware. This provides fast and accurate calibrated soil parameter data, allowing quick and efficient information to follow with a reliable and cost-effective geotechnical report from one of our well established and reputable clients.

Cone Penetrometer pore pressure test (CPTu)

Using our electrical piezocone for the CPTu test it is possible to acquire, with continuous pushing, the qc (tip resistance) and the fs (lateral friction) every centimetre compared with 20cm obtained from the mechanical Begemann. The system also acquires the value of the pore pressure at the u2 position, the penetration tilt angle and the dissipation time via an in-situ static dissipation test.

Dynamic Probe Super Hard (DPSH) Test

The DPSH test is a hammer test sometimes used on its own or on a site where conditions do not allow the continuation of a CPTu test. This testing method involves dropping a 63.5kg hammer from a height of 750mm on the rig. This test has a direct correlation to the NSPT test.

Core Sampling

Our core sampling uses a drop hammer method to drive thin-walled plastic sleeves into the ground. We have the ability to obtain specific cores at depths to suit the geotechnical engineer. The core samples extracted are then capped and recorded and can be stored as required.

This method of sampling creates high quality continuous core samples in an undisturbed state. We can test in nearly all soil types from saturated clays to free-draining silts.

Sonic & Rotary Drilling

Our GEO 305 drill rig capabilities (using either standard sonic and rotary) can do:

- Coring with sampling and recovery
- Standard Penetration Test (SPT) where required, with either split-spoon or solid-tip equipment
- Dynamic Top Hammer (DTH) drilling on request

Test Standards

The New Zealand standard on CPT testing (NZS 4402.6.5.3:1988) only covers CPT testing without pore water pressure measurement. Our CPTu testing therefore is conducted in accordance with the international ASTM Standard D5778-12.

Also CPTu, DPSH and SPT testing is conducted in accordance with Parts 1, 2 & 3 of ISO 22476.

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)

New for 2015, LandTest is pleased to offer you the latest in GPR - our Quantum by USRadar is the first triple-frequency 3D imager sold commercially in New Zealand. It is capable of significantly greater depths with higher resolution than any other locating technology. Stepped ultrawide-band pulses combine the advantages of pulse radar and stepped frequency radar to offer unsurpassed resolution and depth. New Direct RF sampling technology creates clearer, easier to understand images than previously possible with older radar technologies.

With this technology we can map several metres through concrete or soil with incredible accuracy. With a second pass from a different direction we can create a 3D image of the area, and zoom in on areas where further investigation is needed. Aided by GPS, we can give you greater confidence on the exact situation when looking at a structure.

Possible uses include:

Aerial Photography & Videography

We are using a DJI Phantom quadcopter to take photographs and/or video of sites that need it, as requested by clients whenever they would like to. This can be simply included in sitework requests.

If you have something you want to check to see if we can do it for you, please contact us now.

 


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